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Rare brain disease in children: Major breakthroughs in Rasmussen's encephalitis - Dotemirates
6 month 2 week

Rare brain disease in children: Major breakthroughs in Rasmussen's encephalitis

Chronic focal encephalitis, or Rasmussen's encephalitis, is a rare and devastating inflammatory brain disease that can lead to the destruction or removal of a part of the affected child's brain. Through experiments on humanized mice, a team of researchers from Université de Montréal and the CHU Sainte-Justine and Université de Montréal Hospital (CHUM) research centres has recently proven what scientists had already suspected: the disease is autoimmune, which means that it attacks patients using their own immune system. "Several treatments have been proposed to slow the progression of the disease in affected children; however, these treatments have produced contradictory results,...


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Health News

1 hour 9 minute

Trauma researchers identify characteristics of communities where mass shootings occur

A trauma research team has developed a profile of commonalities among communities where mass shootings have occurred. It includes a shortage of mental health professionals, a relative lack of socialization opportunities, higher rates of income inequality, and relatively high housing costs, according to findings presented today at the American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress 2018. The study, led by Stephen F. Markowiak, MD, a general surgery research fellow at the University of Toledo (Ohio), used data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the U.S. Census, Centers for Disease Control, National Institutes of Health, and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to study...
2 hour 19 minute

High-dose influenza vaccine linked with lower hospitalization rates in dialysis patients

Results from a new study suggest that high-dose influenza vaccine is associated with lower risk for hospitalizations in kidney failure patients on dialysis. The findings appear in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN). High-dose , which contains fourfold more antigen than the standard dose, is linked with fewer cases of and less severe influenza symptoms in the elderly general population. Whether the high-dose influenza vaccine benefits dialysis , whose immune response to vaccination is less robust than healthy patients, is uncertain. To investigate, Dana Miskulin, MD (Tufts Medical Center) and her colleagues...
3 hour 34 minute

Study explores infant body position and learning

A developmental psychologist at the University of California, Riverside, has completed a study that is the first to measure how often infants spend time in different body positions over the first year of life. The study, published in the journal Infancy, aims to understand how the physical context of infants' everyday experiences—in particular, how much time they spend in different body positions—changes over the course of the first year and how these changes are predicted by infants' developing . "I was surprised to find that 3-month-olds are held almost half of their waking days" said John Franchak, an assistant professor...

3 hour 35 minute

Primary care doctors 'not doing enough' to curb STDs

Julie Lopez, 21, has been tested regularly for sexually transmitted diseases since she was a teenager. But when Lopez first asked her primary care doctor about screening, he reacted with surprise, she said. "He said people don't usually ask. But I did," said Lopez, a college student in Pasadena, Calif. "It's really important." Lopez usually goes to Planned Parenthood instead for the tests because "they ask the questions that need to be asked," she said. As rates of steadily rise nationwide, and experts say doctors need to step up screening and treatment. "We know that doctors are not doing enough...
3 hour 35 minute

Midterm elections could decide if 6 million people in families can get affordable insurance

This is a Kaiser Health News story. Last Christmas Eve, Justine Bradford-Trent slipped on ice, slamming to the ground. Her elbow swelled. Was it broken? She couldn’t tell. Because Bradford-Trent was uninsured, she weighed her options. She could go to the emergency room, the immediate but more costly option. The urgent care center cost less, but it was closed for the holiday. The Idaho resident decided to wait and, once the swelling subsided, she concluded it was just a bad bruise. Bradford-Trent, 54, knows she was lucky this time. But, because her family can’t afford health insurance, she worries about...
3 hour 36 minute

Does putting the brakes on outrage bottle up social change?

While outrage is often generally considered a hurdle in the path to civil discourse, a team of psychologists suggest outrage—specifically, moral outrage—may have beneficial outcomes, such as inspiring people to take part in long-term collective action. In a literature review, the team, led by two Penn State moral psychologists, combined findings from the fields of moral psychology and intergroup psychology to investigate the dynamics of outrage, which they define as anger at the violation of one's own moral standards. In moral psychology, outrage is generally considered a negative emotion that leads to, at worst, an escalation of the conflict, or,...