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Medical Xpress


1 month 2 week

'Unfinished agenda' in preventing lead poisoning

Over the years, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and its partners have made major progress towards reducing lead exposure in the United States. But more work remains in preventing lead poisoning in US children and adults, according to a special supplement to the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice. While US population blood lead levels continue to decline, researchers, public health officials, and policymakers still face challenges in reaching national goals in the fight against lead , according to an introductory editorial by Adrienne S. Ettinger, ScD, MPH, Perri Z. Ruckart, MPH, and Timothy A. Dignam, Ph.D., MPH,...
1 month 2 week

Mean cumulative lifetime prevalence of eczema 9.9 percent

(HealthDay)—The mean cumulative lifetime prevalence of atopic eczema is 9.9 percent, according to a research letter published online Dec. 4 in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Katrina Abuabara, M.D., from the University of California in Los Angeles, and colleagues estimated the age-specific prevalence of active across the using data from 1994 to 2013 from the Health Improvement Network. They calculated the prevalence of active disease requiring a physician visit or prescription during each year of follow-up. The researchers found that the cumulative lifetime prevalence of atopic eczema was 9.9 percent among 8,604,333 persons aged 0 to 99 years, with the...
1 month 2 week

Study finds increased long-term mortality in pediatric firearm injury survivors

Children and adolescents who survive assault, including by firearm, have increased long?term mortality compared to those who survive unintentional, nonviolent trauma. That is the primary finding of a study reported in the Proceedings of the 2018 AEM Consensus Conference: Aligning the Pediatric Emergency Medicine Research Agenda to Reduce Health Outcome Gaps, to be published in the December 2018 issue of Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM), a journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM). The lead author of the study is Ashkon Shaahinfar, MD, MPH, attending physician and ultrasound director, Division of Emergency Medicine, at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland...

1 month 2 week

High lead levels found in some spices purchased abroad

Investigations of lead poisoning cases in New York City (NYC) have found high levels of lead in certain spices purchased abroad, reports a study in the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, part of a special supplement devoted to Lead Poisoning Prevention. The study by Paromita Hore, Ph.D., MPH, and colleagues at the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene highlights the potential risks of lead exposure from "non-traditional" sources, even as US population blood levels continue to decline. "While lead-based paint and occupational lead hazards remain the primary sources of lead exposures among New York City's lead-poisoned children...
1 month 2 week

Use of telemedicine low for substance use disorder treatment

(HealthDay)—The use of telemedicine for substance use disorder (tele-SUD) is relatively low in a commercially insured population, according to a study published in the December issue of Health Affairs. Haiden A. Huskamp, Ph.D., from Harvard Medical School in Boston, and colleagues describe how tele-SUD is being used and identify characteristics of tele-SUD users using claims data from 2010 to 2017. They note several key regulatory and reimbursement barriers to greater use of tele-SUD and note that both Congress and the states are considering or have passed legislation to address these barriers. The researchers found that despite a rapid increase during...
1 month 2 week

Expanded cord blood shows potential for use in adult bone marrow transplants

Umbilical cord blood stem cells that are cultured and expanded outside the body before being used for bone marrow transplant in adult blood cancer patients appear safe and restore blood count recovery faster than standard cord blood. The findings, led by a Duke Cancer Institute researcher, are from a phase I/II study of the biologic treatment, NiCord, at 11 clinical trial sites. The study is publishing online Dec. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology and advances efforts to improve cord blood use among adults who have been diagnosed with blood cancers. Cord blood has been shown to be a...

1 month 2 week

Toxic amounts of vitamin D spur dog food recall

(HealthDay)—Eight brands of dry dog food have been recalled because of potentially deadly amounts of vitamin D, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says. Vitamin D is an important nutrient for dogs. But too much can cause symptoms such as vomiting, appetite loss, increased thirst and urination, excessive drooling and weight loss. Toxic levels of the can lead to kidney failure and death. If your dog has eaten any of the recalled brands and show these symptoms, you should contact your veterinarian immediately, the FDA said. The recalled brands include Nutrisca; Natural Life Pet Products; Sunshine Mills, Inc.; ANF, Inc.;...
1 month 2 week

Are you a victim of 'clean plate' syndrome?

(HealthDay)—If your belly is full from a delicious holiday feast but there's one more sweet left on the dessert tray, will you hold back or yield to temptation? New research suggests that you'll give in, driven by a widely shared attitude towards that prompts you to "clean the plate," even if you're not really still hungry. It's a form of "consumption closure," nutritionists say. But over time it makes keeping the waistline trim an uphill battle. "The concept of a clean plate has many roots," noted Connie Diekman, director of university nutrition at Washington University in St. Louis. "The starving...
1 month 2 week

Single workout can boost metabolism for days

Lounging around all weekend may weigh heavy on the minds of the health conscious. But these sedentary stretches may not affect the waistline, provided they're preceded by a bit of exercise. A new study from UT Southwestern Medical Center shows in mice that influence metabolism are active for up to two days after a single workout. The research offers new insight into the brain's potential role in fitness and—in the longer term—may provide a target for developing therapies that improve metabolism. "It doesn't take much to alter the activity of these neurons," said Dr. Kevin Williams, a neuroscientist at UT...

1 month 2 week

Fasting for lab tests isn't good for patients with diabetes

Fasting before getting your blood drawn for cholesterol tests is common practice, but new research from Michigan State University shows it is a contributing factor of low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, in patients who take diabetes medications. The study, published in the International Journal of Endocrinology, shows that people with are more likely to experience FEEHD—fasting-evoked en route in diabetes—than they would if they hadn't fasted. The "en route" comes from who have an episode while driving to a lab for work. Saleh Aldasouqi, an endocrinologist in the College of Human Medicine, explained that eating before a lab test does...
1 month 2 week

Hearts from unusual donors could help meet growing transplant demand

Researchers say the ever-growing waiting list of hopeful heart transplant recipients could be trimmed down if only more patients were given the option to open their hearts to unlikely donors. Two new Stanford University-led studies published Dec. 4 explore opportunities to expand the pool by using hearts that many transplant centers overlook: those that once belonged to people who had an active hepatitis C infection, and to those who were obese. The number of heart transplants has risen steadily over the past decade. More than 100,000 Americans are sick enough to need a heart transplant, but in 2017, only 3,244...
1 month 2 week

Young black gay men have vastly higher HIV rates yet fewer partners

Young black men who have sex with men (MSM) are 16 times more likely to have an HIV infection than their white peers despite more frequent testing for HIV and being less likely to have unsafe sex, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. The study was recently published in the Journal of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndromes. If these rates persist, one out of every two black MSM will become infected with HIV at some point in their lives, compared to one in five Hispanic MSM and one in 11 white MSM, reports the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "We have...